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The South of Ireland and Her Poor Anonymous

The South of Ireland and Her Poor

Anonymous

Published February 2nd 2012
ISBN : 9780217502795
Paperback
58 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1843. Excerpt: ... There exists, besides, a difficultyMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1843. Excerpt: ... There exists, besides, a difficulty common to all -- the extraordinary uncertainty of arriving at exact truth, of bottling a fact, as a friend of mine calls it. It would not be easy to say whence this arises amongst the lower classes: whether from the air, as some deduce the habit of making bulls- whether from the origin of the natives, (Punica), or whether it be the result of non-education. Few, however, of those who know Ireland will deny that it is peculiarly hard to arrive at exact truth respecting any matter in which the people are interested or concerned: that this difficulty is, in some cases, designedly caused, I am certain. On the occasion of a fact-hunting stranger coming to our shores, I have heard it told with glee, how a few pounds judiciously expended in purchasing clothes, had stamped a part of the country with very false character. The year of the stranger, in those parts, will be an era to the inhabitants not less to be counted from than the Hegira by the followers of the Prophet. There are reasons assigned in common, why Ireland should be in her present position- and besides these, each party has its own pet source of misfortune. It really would appear that greater stress is laid upon this latter than on the former- and as misfortunes come not single spies, the pet grievance is connected with religion, and the mot denigme of each party becomes the badge of the tribe, and the motto of the banner, low wages, want of capital, overpopulation, absenteeism, high rents, (for though each landlord may be the man, he is sure to blame his neighbour, ) latterly the poor-law -- these are made common cause of by both parties: to these the Roman Catholics add payment of tithes, seizure of church lands, mal-government by Engla...